[murmur] is a documentary oral history project that records stories and memories told about specific geographic locations. We collect and make accessible people’s personal histories and anecdotes about the places in their neighborhoods that are important to them. In each of these locations we install a [murmur] sign with a telephone number on it that anyone can call with a mobile phone to listen to that story while standing in that exact spot, and engaging in the physical experience of being right where the story takes place. Some stories suggest that the listener walk around, following a certain path through a place, while others allow a person to wander with both their feet and their gaze.

[murmur] was first established in Toronto’s Kensington Market in 2003. That same year projects were launched in Vancouver’s Chinatown and along St. Laurent Boulevard in Montreal, and over the past few years [murmur] has grown and expanded across other neighbourhoods in Toronto, Calgary, and San Jose, California. [murmur] Edinburgh launched in Leith in January 2007, and [murmur] Dublin Docklands launched in May 2007. [murmur] Australia launched in Geelong in February 2009.

[murmur] was initially developed with the assistance of the CFC Media Lab, Toronto.

"An old and nearly forgotten cemetery, located a few blocks northeast of Fort York, is the final resting place for some of Toronto’s founding citizens. Victoria Memorial Square is home to the city’s first military cemetery and is one of its earliest public parks.
Standing in the park today you never would know that it holds roughly 400 graves, mostly those of men, women, and children connected with the fort who died between 1793 and 1863.
Over the course of its history, Victoria Square has been both an object of commemoration and a victim of neglect. It is an enchanting space. It whispers stories of 19th-century life and death, and it speaks to the values Torontonians have placed on their collective history.”
(via City of Toronto, Arts Heritage & Culture: Heart and Stone: The history of Victoria Square)

"An old and nearly forgotten cemetery, located a few blocks northeast of Fort York, is the final resting place for some of Toronto’s founding citizens. Victoria Memorial Square is home to the city’s first military cemetery and is one of its earliest public parks.

Standing in the park today you never would know that it holds roughly 400 graves, mostly those of men, women, and children connected with the fort who died between 1793 and 1863.

Over the course of its history, Victoria Square has been both an object of commemoration and a victim of neglect. It is an enchanting space. It whispers stories of 19th-century life and death, and it speaks to the values Torontonians have placed on their collective history.”

(via City of Toronto, Arts Heritage & Culture: Heart and Stone: The history of Victoria Square)

"Brock’s present monument was rebuilt in 1853 after the original monument was bombed by a terrorist in 1840." This month is the 200th anniversary of the Battle of York (Toronto). Brock was killed later that year, in October, at the Battle of Queenston Heights.

"Brock’s present monument was rebuilt in 1853 after the original monument was bombed by a terrorist in 1840." This month is the 200th anniversary of the Battle of York (Toronto). Brock was killed later that year, in October, at the Battle of Queenston Heights.

After all, what IKEA is really doing here is finding a place to sink a small part of its huge pile of cash. They want to earn a profit over 10 to 20 years, not the three or four years of a conventional property developer – and are therefore very interested in the long-term livability of the project. “We’re just securing our money long-term – and of course creating more profits at the end,” Mr. Müller says. “But we are acting as a long-term investor, we are equity-driven, so we are acting very differently from a developer.” In a very real sense, the furniture company wants to invest its money in your entire life.
Welcome to Ikea-land: Furniture giant begins urban planning project - The Globe and Mail. Perfect to come home to after a hard day’s work at Paternoster Square.
Theatre of the Rule of Law presents the first sustained critique of global rule of law promotion - an expansive industry at the heart of international development, post-conflict reconstruction and security policy today. While successful in articulating and disseminating an effective global public policy, rule of law promotion has largely failed in its stated objectives of raising countries out of poverty and taming violent conflict. Furthermore, in its execution, this work deviates sharply from ‘the rule of law’ as commonly conceived. To explain this, Stephen Humphreys draws on the history of the rule of law as a concept, examples of legal export during colonial times, and a spectrum of contemporary interventions by development agencies and international organisations. Rule of law promotion is shown to be a kind of theatre, the staging of a morality tale about the good life, intended for edification and emulation, but blind to its own internal contradictions.
Amazon.com: Theatre of the Rule of Law: Transnational Legal Intervention in Theory and Practice. While we’re on the subject of the inculcation of neoliberalism.
Since the election of Mayor David Miller in November 2003, Toronto has experienced a wave of civic pride and enthusiasm not felt in decades. At long last, Torontonians see their city as a place of possibility and potential. Visions of a truly workable, liveable and world-class city are once again dancing in citizens’ heads. In the past two years, this spirit has, directly or indirectly, manifested itself in multifarious forms: in writer Sheila Heti’s sui generis lecture series, Trampoline Hall; in the transformation of derelict hotels such as the Drake and the Gladstone into cultural hotspots; in renewed interest in waterfront revitalization and public transportation; in exciting, controversial architectural developments such as the OCAD building, the expansion of the ROM and the AGO; in the [murmur] project, which catalogues stories about Toronto neighbourhoods and broadcasts them to people’s cell phones; in the explosion of the local independent music scene.
Amazon.com: Utopia: Towards a New Toronto (uTOpia Series). Someone mentioned psychogeography. Re Toronto navel-gazing, there is the uTOpia series of books (and, of course, Spacing magazine). I remember I bought this when it came out as I followed a couple of Toronto blogs (like Imagining Toronto, which lead to this book) but I never read it, nor did I purchase the increasingly specialized sequels. This one did come with a charming map of “future Toronto”, including canals down Dundas, which I hung in our Vancouver apartment as a reminder of slightly more interesting times. It was, however, somewhat problematic in that the  drafters had replaced poor downtown areas like Moss Park with wide open parks. Perhaps they were thought to be beyond Regent Park style salvation.
minutes 01

- Is EMPIRE a really a byword for neoliberalism? Are there differences in the two?

- how does the book in relation to social networking? FACEBOOK AND PRIVATISATION

- what is the relationship to hope? (nuns)

-  Unions - can act as legitimating structures for capitalism, and there is internal corruption, but what is the alternative?

- Examine contemporary methods of media (both left and right wing) framing events as sin.

[Tompkins Sq. Park - early instance of gentrification]

[REF - Chris Kraus film How to Shoot a Crime (1987) is an interesting piece that examines both crime scene videography]

[Halifax - Africville - community dissipated, stuff moved in garbage trucks which caused outrage]

[occupy and the rhetoric of sinning]

- Terminology - PROCEDURE. ? - is the idea of  procedure a problem?

The fire starts to die out, Sixteen Candles comes to an end, and I ask if I can see his closet—after all, he designed his own $5,000 arctic-fox-fur, gold-hardware bomber jacket. We wander into the house, a woody manor. Drake enters some numbers into a keypad on a bookshelf and—presto!— it swings open into his massive, paisley-swathed sleeping chamber, complete with a California king bed, for which he must purchase custom sheets.

When I ask about the strange square above the bed, he grabs a remote, and a projection system emerges from the ceiling.

Neato, I say. “Would I have you already?” he asks. “Are you sleeping with me?”

Ladies and gentlemen, our unknowing OVOXO mascot, Drake

Drake Interview GQ April 2012 Issue: Style: GQ

Source: GQ
3/26/12 — 11:49am Short URL: http://tmblr.co/Z8DOovIbT0C7 Filed under: #drake 
Trying on 10 outfits and staring critically at the mirror before leaving the house is practically a teenage rite of passage. But these days, girls know precisely how their peers are judging them, thanks to the “Like” button on Facebook. “When I choose my profile picture, I want people to ‘Like,’ it,” said Grace. In fact, she and her friends are keenly aware of how to goose the numbers. “You get more ‘Likes’ if it’s a model shot and not a goofy picture with your friends,” she explained.